Seaside Towns – The new Shoreditch?

We all love to be beside the seaside. Julian Stock writes about the decline of the British seaside holiday and the revival happening in coastal towns.

 

The decline of the traditional British seaside summer holiday over the past fifty years has left once-delightful resorts in states of grimness and depression as deprivation and poverty in coastal towns became far worse than the rest of the country. Places that had once thrived on tourism were suffering in terms of health, employment and income. The government’s coastal communities regeneration fund, backed by revenue from offshore wind farms, sought to support the economic development of coastal communities.

Now optimism is emerging, fuelled by nostalgia, the availability of reasonably priced holidays and housing costs in London beyond the reach of many, and there is a resurgence in the fortunes of many of the south east’s coastal towns.

Seaside towns are making a comeback as those escaping from London are boosting the fortunes of towns such as Southend-on-Sea in Essex and Worthing, Hove and Brighton in Sussex, and Margate and Broadstairs in Kent. Savills have identified emerging prime locations in the region as property prices rise in response to sustained growing demand. They have assessed that properties in the south-east within 100m of the coast command a 13.6% premium.

With an ageing population in coastal towns, new blood and a younger culture is vital to transform the region’s fortunes. Towns such as Margate and Hastings are becoming more bohemian places, with artistic communities, ‘vintage’ furniture shops, period architecture and pavement cafés. All faintly Shoreditch, but with fresh air and at a fraction of the cost.

There have been a plethora of new residential-led mixed use and cultural developments emerging in the southern seaside towns and we have been working in the region for the past five years, bringing forward a number of projects which will continue the regeneration of these historically popular places.

 

REGENERATION IN SOUTHEND-ON-SEA

If anywhere epitomised the cheap-and-cheerful seaside town, it used to be Southend. However, if London’s house price explosion did anywhere any favours, it was here – with central London just 45 minutes away by train. In 2013, it boasted the highest property price rises in the country.

INSIGHT chart

We have designed a striking development with a diverse mix of uses on a significant plot next to the seafront, located along the ‘Golden Mile’. Marine Plaza reestablishes a connection to the seafront with a variety of restaurants, bars, shops and public realm spaces, as well as 282 homes across six buildings, ranging in height from four to 14 storeys. The active and animated public frontage will create new streets and spaces for residents and the wider public to enjoy.

SW1a

15.06.08 Marine Plaza

 

  • summer-beach-huts-1500x1000
  • SW1a
  • INSIGHT chart

Seaside Towns – The new Shoreditch?

We all love to be beside the seaside. Julian Stock writes about the decline of the British seaside holiday and the revival happening in coastal towns.

 

The decline of the traditional British seaside summer holiday over the past fifty years has left once-delightful resorts in states of grimness and depression as deprivation and poverty in coastal towns became far worse than the rest of the country. Places that had once thrived on tourism were suffering in terms of health, employment and income. The government’s coastal communities regeneration fund, backed by revenue from offshore wind farms, sought to support the economic development of coastal communities.

Now optimism is emerging, fuelled by nostalgia, the availability of reasonably priced holidays and housing costs in London beyond the reach of many, and there is a resurgence in the fortunes of many of the south east’s coastal towns.

Seaside towns are making a comeback as those escaping from London are boosting the fortunes of towns such as Southend-on-Sea in Essex and Worthing, Hove and Brighton in Sussex, and Margate and Broadstairs in Kent. Savills have identified emerging prime locations in the region as property prices rise in response to sustained growing demand. They have assessed that properties in the south-east within 100m of the coast command a 13.6% premium.

With an ageing population in coastal towns, new blood and a younger culture is vital to transform the region’s fortunes. Towns such as Margate and Hastings are becoming more bohemian places, with artistic communities, ‘vintage’ furniture shops, period architecture and pavement cafés. All faintly Shoreditch, but with fresh air and at a fraction of the cost.

There have been a plethora of new residential-led mixed use and cultural developments emerging in the southern seaside towns and we have been working in the region for the past five years, bringing forward a number of projects which will continue the regeneration of these historically popular places.

 

REGENERATION IN SOUTHEND-ON-SEA

If anywhere epitomised the cheap-and-cheerful seaside town, it used to be Southend. However, if London’s house price explosion did anywhere any favours, it was here – with central London just 45 minutes away by train. In 2013, it boasted the highest property price rises in the country.

INSIGHT chart

We have designed a striking development with a diverse mix of uses on a significant plot next to the seafront, located along the ‘Golden Mile’. Marine Plaza reestablishes a connection to the seafront with a variety of restaurants, bars, shops and public realm spaces, as well as 282 homes across six buildings, ranging in height from four to 14 storeys. The active and animated public frontage will create new streets and spaces for residents and the wider public to enjoy.

SW1a

15.06.08 Marine Plaza

 

  • summer-beach-huts-1500x1000
  • SW1a
  • INSIGHT chart